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The Human Cost of Social Connectivity, Brian Solis

September 15, 2011
I’m not entirely sure where this article fits into Multiliteracies, but it does and maybe the sooner the better ~ part of the firehouse / filter / shallows / narrows discussion because they all contribute to “Social Media Fatigue” and “Follow Fatigue” ~ symptoms of “Chaos Navigation Failure Syndrome” (CNFS, a syndrome not a disordet and I just made it up)

Over the years, we???ve learned the importance of social media in our professional and personal lives. It is after all a revolution in of itself. From improving governments to socializing businesses to improving collaboration and learning to investing in personal development, social media is influencing and reshaping all it touches. But there are very real costs associated with social media and they extend well beyond technology, popular networks, trends or monumental events.

You are here because you live and breathe new media and with each day that passes, you place unprecedented value on social and mobile networks and the role they play in your livelihood. Your experiences are incredibly personal, but are also influenced by your connections. The value you glean from each network is directly correlated to the relationships you forge within each network. The content that you curate, create, and consume dictates the focus and significance of your interest graphs.  The gravity that attracts people and information to your egosystem is essentially yours and only yours to define. And, that???s the point of this post. We must study the human cost of social media to improve how it is we adopt and employ it in life, study, and work.

About the human cost tied to social networking: “The reality is that the cost of social networking is great and without checks and balances, engagement can cost us more capital than we have to spend”

Is the new “tree of knowledge” is network?

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